Notorious serial killer Samuel Little indicted for 1993 Lubbock

Notorious serial killer Samuel Little indicted for 1993 Lubbock murder

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Samuel Little Samuel Little
LUBBOCK, Texas -

The Lubbock Police Department held a press conference Thursday afternoon to announce its detectives believe they have finally found the person who killed Bobbie Fields in 1993, indicting Samuel Little, who is considered one of the most prolific serial killers of all time, for the murder.

Detective Brandon Price was assigned to this case last November as a part of the Lubbock Metropolitan Special Crimes Unit.

After Samuel Little admitted committing a murder near Wichita Falls, Price reviewed Little's criminal history in 1993 and considered it possible that this was actually the murder of Fields.

Price said Little was released from Travis County Jail on August 3, 1993, six days before Fields' body was found, and the original vehicle of interest in the case was a 1978 yellow Cadillac Eldorado, which Price learned was a car Little was known to drive.

On August 20, Price was able to interview Little in California, in hopes of attaining corroborating information without informing Little of the specifics of the case.

Through Little's photographic memory, Price said Little essentially indicted himself unintentionally.

"If you look on the map where the blue square is at, he literally was able to mark that location on his own spontaneously, and there was direction to it because we didn't want to lead him at all. He also spontaneously put out there about the Cadillac as a reference in time to him in his mind where he had that car at. Our whole goal was: You have to imagine going in there silent. You introduce yourself, but don't tell him where you work, trying to make sure that this person feels comfortable with you to give information and based off of that, he had spontaneously recall and offered information we can corroborate with the great work of the initial detectives," Price said.

Price said without this corroborating information from Little in the interview, the case would still be unsolved.

He said giving the victim's family closure in all of this makes his work all worth it.

"That's part of the reason of doing the job: The families getting closure. Because we're entrusted with the responsibility of making that happen and we can't always make it happen, but we try to and when we do, obviously that's what makes us come back on Monday," Price said.

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