New study finds 55 percent of graduates have negative outlook on

New study finds 55 percent of graduates have negative outlook on job market

LUBBOCK, Texas -

According to a recent study conducted by MidAmerica Nazarene University, more than 50 percent of new graduates have a negative outlook on the current job market. 

Instead, many recent grads are going back to school in hopes to further their career paths. 

"Plans for after graduation I'm applying for med school this summer and then after I will go to wherever I get in. Hopefully get a degree and pursue pediatrics," one graduate said.

CEO of Workforce Solutions of the South Plains Martin Aguirre said those not going back to school will leave Lubbock, creating a gap in the job market. 

"A lot of our graduates from Texas Tech, they'll go home. Yes they came from Dallas and they'll go back to Dallas to look for a job," he said. "Even some of our local kids will look for the big city."

He said for Lubbock's size its economy needs additional workers to fill the void. 

"Lubbock's unemployment rate is 2.3 percent," he said. "It's not enough to replace everyone that is in the market that's turning over and turning. So every worker we can find we can use somewhere in the economy." 

Despite millennials concerns with finding a job, Aguirre believes a recent shift in the workforce could make it easier to land a job, even here in Lubbock. 

"We're looking for people to replace a whole generation. Baby boomers up until now have been the largest segment of the workforce," he said. "And I think this is the first year that millennials now have taken over that segment." 

Additionally, 80 to 90 thousand jobs were created within the last year in Texas. 

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