Texas House passes bill to potentially cut down on suspended lic

Texas House passes bill to potentially cut down on suspended licenses

Posted: Updated:
LUBBOCK, Texas -

The Texas House unanimously moved to repeal the Driver Responsibility Program Thursday. 

That is the "points system" the state uses to keep track of traffic violations, which can eventually strip your license.

It funds about half the state's emergency trauma system, but reps said they need to protect low-income citizens.

Last year alone, 1.4 million Texas drivers had suspended licenses for unpaid fines.

Attorney Justin Kiechler said the Driver Responsibility Program is getting out of hand.

"If I had to guess, I probably have 15 to 20 clients right now where we're trying to figure out some sort of drivers license related issues of surcharges or a suspension that is leading to all of these fees," Kiechler said.

Kiechler said those fees range from $6,000 to $10,000.

Attorney Kris Espino said these surcharges can trap people in debt. 

"You want to get insurance, you want to drive legally, but it just creates this unending cycle that can be very difficult to get out of, especially for those who have low incomes," Espino said.

Under the house bill that passed preliminary votes unanimously, the surcharges for minor violations would instead be directed towards more significant offenses like DWIs.

Espino said this would focus on real problems, not just a couple speeding tickets. 

"I think everybody knows DWI and the toll that it encounters. I don't think there's anyone whose life hasn't been affected in some way by it," Espino said.

  • Top StoriesTop StoriesMore>>

  • Retiring Farmers Union president: Family farms still viable

    Retiring Farmers Union president: Family farms still viable

    Sunday, December 15 2019 10:36 AM EST2019-12-15 15:36:19 GMT
    Monday, December 16 2019 1:17 AM EST2019-12-16 06:17:32 GMT
    (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File). FILE - In this Sept. 20, 2016, file Roger Johnson, President of the National Farmers Union, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. As Johnson prepares to step down after 11 years leading the group, he's well...(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File). FILE - In this Sept. 20, 2016, file Roger Johnson, President of the National Farmers Union, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. As Johnson prepares to step down after 11 years leading the group, he's well...
    (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File). FILE - In this Sept. 20, 2016, file Roger Johnson, President of the National Farmers Union, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. As Johnson prepares to step down after 11 years leading the group, he's well...(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File). FILE - In this Sept. 20, 2016, file Roger Johnson, President of the National Farmers Union, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. As Johnson prepares to step down after 11 years leading the group, he's well...
    National Farmers Union President Roger Johnson is retiring after a lifetime of farming and advocating for agriculture.
    National Farmers Union President Roger Johnson is retiring after a lifetime of farming and advocating for agriculture.
  • Comey: 'Real sloppiness' in Russia probe but no misconduct

    Comey: 'Real sloppiness' in Russia probe but no misconduct

    Sunday, December 15 2019 11:26 AM EST2019-12-15 16:26:24 GMT
    Monday, December 16 2019 1:17 AM EST2019-12-16 06:17:17 GMT
    (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf). Former FBI Director James Comey talks with "Fox News Sunday" anchor Chris Wallace, Sunday morning, Dec. 15, 2019, in Washington.(AP Photo/Kevin Wolf). Former FBI Director James Comey talks with "Fox News Sunday" anchor Chris Wallace, Sunday morning, Dec. 15, 2019, in Washington.
    (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf). Former FBI Director James Comey talks with "Fox News Sunday" anchor Chris Wallace, Sunday morning, Dec. 15, 2019, in Washington.(AP Photo/Kevin Wolf). Former FBI Director James Comey talks with "Fox News Sunday" anchor Chris Wallace, Sunday morning, Dec. 15, 2019, in Washington.
    Former FBI Director James Comey is acknowledging that a Justice Department inspector general report identified “real sloppiness" in the surveillance of a former Trump campaign aide.
    Former FBI Director James Comey is acknowledging that a Justice Department inspector general report identified “real sloppiness" in the surveillance of a former Trump campaign aide.
  • Cowboys render coin toss mix-up moot, throttle Rams 44-21

    Cowboys render coin toss mix-up moot, throttle Rams 44-21

    Sunday, December 15 2019 8:06 PM EST2019-12-16 01:06:39 GMT
    Monday, December 16 2019 12:46 AM EST2019-12-16 05:46:51 GMT
    (AP Photo/Michael Ainsworth). Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott (4) talks with referee Walt Anderson (66) in the first quarter of an NFL football game against the Los Angeles Rams in Arlington, Texas, Sunday, Dec. 15, 2019.(AP Photo/Michael Ainsworth). Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott (4) talks with referee Walt Anderson (66) in the first quarter of an NFL football game against the Los Angeles Rams in Arlington, Texas, Sunday, Dec. 15, 2019.
    (AP Photo/Michael Ainsworth). Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott (4) talks with referee Walt Anderson (66) in the first quarter of an NFL football game against the Los Angeles Rams in Arlington, Texas, Sunday, Dec. 15, 2019.(AP Photo/Michael Ainsworth). Dallas Cowboys quarterback Dak Prescott (4) talks with referee Walt Anderson (66) in the first quarter of an NFL football game against the Los Angeles Rams in Arlington, Texas, Sunday, Dec. 15, 2019.
    Dak Prescott made up for the gaffe that wasn't on the coin toss.
    Dak Prescott made up for the gaffe that wasn't on the coin toss.
Powered by Frankly
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2019 RAMAR. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices.