How religious groups across West Texas are ensuring security in

How religious groups across West Texas are ensuring security in wake of Sri Lanka attacks

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LUBBOCK, Texas -

Nearly 300 people were killed in Sunday's deadly attacks against churches and hotels in Sri Lanka.

This marks yet another attack on a religious institution, as this comes one month after the mosque shootings in New Zealand.

Statistics show Texas is home to the most church shootings of any state since 1999, including the mass shooting in Sutherland Springs that killed 26 and injured 20 others two years ago.

Rob Lindley, the pastor of Oakwood Methodist Church, said this prompted members of his church to legally carry concealed weapons during the service.

"After one of the shootings, I had three of my members come up to me and say: Pastor, we just want you to know that we're to help protect you and help protect the church," Lindley said.

Samer Altabaa, with the Lubbock Islamic Center, said the specific attacks on mosques recently have made security the number one concern. 

"We always have like security people, policemen, security cameras taking place, and we even have members of our community who always watch around, make sure everything is secure and report any suspicious activities," Altabaa said.

While they may share different religions, he said groups across West Texas are working together, side by side, to ensure the security of their worship. 

"We always work together with other people of faith and people from different types of backgrounds. We always work together to make sure there is no place for hatred or violence among our communities," Altabaa said.

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