Lubbock County Commissioners Court approves software provider sw - FOX34 Lubbock

Lubbock County Commissioners Court approves software provider switch

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LUBBOCK, Texas -

The Lubbock County Commissioner's Court approves an agreement to switch its software provider from KI Corp to Tyler Technologies. It'll go into effect once the current contract expires next year, non integrated software is one of many challenges Lubbock County employees have suffered for years.

"It's just the time to look at something out there that is integrated," said Bill McCay, Lubbock County commissioner for precinct 1. "And could we believe provide a safer working environment for our employees especially law enforcement and actually be more productive."

The county currently spends $2 million a year with KI Corp. The new proposed vendor, Tyler Technologies would cost the county any where from $6.5 to $7 million up front.

"In a five year time period we would have saved half a million to a million dollars," said McCay.  "Over ten years about ten million dollars in savings, so yeah that initial cost that we've got budgeted, but then after that initial cost then the annual yearly cost is substantially lower."

Essentially the county will be paying both KI Corp and Tyler Technologies at the same time during the transition period. 

In response to the new agreement a Tyler Technologies spokesperson had this to say: 

“We’re pleased that the Lubbock County Commissioners Court has decided to expand their relationship with Tyler Technologies by selecting software solutions to help manage courts and public safety functions. Given that so many Tyler employees live and work in Lubbock, it’s rewarding to see the county build on the success they have already experienced with our financial management and county recording solutions. Lubbock County is well on its way to fully embracing our Connected Communities vision as they integrate Tyler software solutions across the Courts, Sheriff, County & District Clerk, Auditor, and Treasurer offices to help their community become more responsive to the needs of their constituents." 

Commissioner McCay said it will take about a year or two to make the transition once the contract with KI Corp ends and the new contract with Tyler Technologies begins. 

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