Distracted drivers admit to "poor decision making"

Distracted drivers admit to "poor decision making"

A distracted driver could end up ruining any day for almost anyone. Envista Forensics surveyed drivers who confess to splitting their attention while driving. 

The survey put dangerous driving into four categories: rushed, distracted, intoxicated and aggressive. DPS Sergeant John Gonzalez says when it comes to distracted driving, there is one common denominator. 

"You see it every day. I can be driving my personal vehicle and the biggest distraction is my cell phone. Whether they are talking on the cell phone, dialing on the cell phone, or texting on the cell phone, you have that technology in front of you and it's distracting," Gonzalez said. 

Of the survey's four categories, the majority results for each didn't really justify the poor driving, marking the reasoning as poor judgment. Gonzalez says that's made the license process more difficult. 

"They're required to complete more driver education programs before they initially get their license. Some of that is because of distractions and texting and driving," Gonzalez said. 

Cindi Newlin, with "Drive Trainers", says technology has put millennial in more danger. 

"How can I make eye contact with you? How do I talk with you? The teens don't want to connect eyes with anyone,"  Newlin said. 

 Newlin says the most dangerous intersection in town is by the South Loop and Quaker. 

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