Eppler: "It Comes At Night" is nerve-racking

Eppler: "It Comes At Night" is nerve-racking

"It Comes at Night" is a movie that sneaks up on you. Even the title is a bit misleading because it's not about monsters, zombies or ghosts. The truly scary thing here is fear itself.

Joel Edgerton, who is quickly becoming one of the most interesting and reliable actors out there, stars as a father who lives secluded with his wife and son in a cabin in the woods. When a mysterious visitor (Christopher Abbott) shows up, they're more than cautious.

 As the trailer reveals, Abbott is another family man and Edgerton and his kin decide to let them move in as long as they follow the house rules: no going out at night, the only entry is through one door, and no one goes anywhere alone.

The movie takes its time building characters and relationships in closed quarters which is key to the payoff.

In one of writer and director Trey Edward Schultz's many unexpected storytelling choices, it's not so much Edgerton's character who is our point of view but rather his son, played by Kelvin Harrison, Jr., who suffers from terrible nightmares.

This is a deeply unnerving psychological thriller plumbing the depths of the dark side of the human condition, and it gets there in a hurry - a quick 90 minutes. Its mood of dread had me constantly squirming in my seat, and the tension may fry your nerves to a frazzle.

It all builds to a truly horrifying climax and a brilliant final shot. "It Comes at Night" is a small movie that packs a wallop.
 

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