Eppler: 'Deadpool' a gleefully crass superhero satire

Eppler: 'Deadpool' a gleefully crass superhero satire

"Deadpool" arrives at the perfect time in movie theaters when audiences need something fresh from the comic book world. It's an R-rated gleefully crass blast of superhero satire until it eventually settles in to become the type of movie it's mocking.

But even when it starts going through the paces of a traditional save the kidnapped girlfriend plot, it's still a lot of fun thanks to a very funny script and a charismatic performance by star Ryan Reynolds. He even pokes fun at himself in "Deadpool" since he's been in four other failed comic book movies, most notably the gawdawful "Green Lantern."

"Deadpool" feels like the role he was born to play, fitting him like that tight red spandex suit. He's a machine gun of one-liners as Wade Wilson, who is given superpowers and a horrible disfigurement after undergoing experimental cancer treatment.

The movie lets us know right away what we're in for with Deadpool instigating a profanity-laced bloodbath. In fact, I saw a couple people walk out of the screening I attended in the first ten minutes. For fans, that's a good sign the filmmakers did this right.

I loved the love story between Reynolds and Morena Baccarin from "Homeland," two creatures of the wild who found each other. And a montage between them is gold. 

Eventually, Deadpool hooks up with a couple boring minor "X-Men" to do battle, and it turns into pretty standard comic book movie fare. It's not subversive, but at least it's knowingly self-deprecating.

Deadpool keeps saying he's not a hero, but his movie does something heroic by daring to be different.
 

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